Glossary

During you search for your own place to live you’ll likely stumble across several terms in English and definitely in Danish you won’t understand. Going around this site you’ll likely find words you won’t understand the complete meaning of, so therefore I’ve made the glossary below that should help explain things. Some words will be direct translations and others I’ll explain the word and what it actually means in Danish society.

Kollegie(Dorm)

Dorms in Denmark are numerous but unlike other countries you often won’t find on-campus dorms, instead many institutions maintain dorms in other parts of the city where they are located. You’ll also find that there are dorms independent of any education institute, these dorms are open for anyone to apply to, the only requisite being that you are enrolled at an accredited institution.

Kollegieværelse(Dormroom)

Kollegieværelse means dorm room in Danish. Dorm rooms in Denmark are small one room apartments with a single resident. The majority have their own toilet bath, some have their own kitchen but having a shared kitchen for all the dorm rooms is not uncommon.

Lejlighed(Apartment)

Lejlighed is the Danish word for apartment.

Værelse (Room)

Værelse means room in Danish and you’ll encounter it with two different meanings. Firstly you’ll see listings like ” 2-værelseslejlighed i København” which means two room apartment in Copenhagen. With Danish listings there are no distinctions between the type of rooms such as living room and bedroom. Therefore, a two-room apartment will have a total of two rooms, now you can expect one of these rooms to only function as a living room but this is implicit in the Danish housing market.

The second type of listing look something like this, “14 m2 værelse i København”. This is a listing for a specific room in an apartment rather than for an apartment itself. It’s important to distinguish between a 1 room/studio apartment and just renting a single room in an apartment.

Fremleje(Subletting/subrenting)

Fremleje is the Danish word for subletting. “Fremleje” is the technically correct term for subletting a single room in for example a 4 room apartment. It is also the correct term for subletting an entire apartment that someone else is renting from a landlord. Most times people will rent an apartment and then sublet it for 6-12 months where they travel or work abroad temporarily.

Depositum(Deposit/ Security Deposit)

In Denmark a landlord can ask for a security deposit equivalent to the 3 months’ rent. Some do ask for less but that rare.

Forudbetalt husleje (Prepaid rent)

Forudbetalt husleje translates to prepaid rent and like the security deposit can be the equivalent of 3 months’ rent. Prepaid rent is like the deposit a form of security but this one is against non-payment from the tenant. If the tenant stops paying rent then the landlord can keep the prepaid rent while terminating the lease.

Indflytningsrapport (Moving in report)

The moving in report is a document that must be filled and signed when a tenant moves into an apartment. The report details the condition of the apartment and if there are any defects or damages to the unit.

Fraflytningsrapport/Udflytningsrapport (Moving Out Report)

The moving out report is a document that must be filled when a tenant moves out of an apartment. The report details the condition of the apartment and if there are any defects or damages to the unit that wasn’t there when the tenant moved in. As a tenant you must fix any defects or damages that was created during your rental period.

Huslejenævn (Danish Rent tribunal)

In Denmark there is an independent entity Huslejenævnet or the Danish Rent Tribunal that handles disputes between tenants and landlords. This entity handles disputes without the need for expensive lawyers. Anyone can start a complaint for a minor fee and many tenants do this if their landlord sets the rent higher than the law permits or if the landlord tries to unlawfully keep your deposit.

Technically every county in Denmark has their own department of the tribunal and so the department in the county in which you live must handle your complaint. If you contact the county or Kommune as it’s called in Danish, they will instruct you on how to contact their department of the tribunal specifically.