Appropriate rent 2018-01-13T11:51:29+00:00

What is appropriate rent levels?

Even before coming to Denmark you’ll notice there are a lot of discussions and questions about rent, what are the appropriate rent levels and what is expensive or cheap. The question is not that easy to answer and depends on several factors, I do go into details about rent if you want to understand it better. Appropriate rent levels vary a lot from city to city naturally, most expats and students settle down in the major cities though so I’ll focus on those here. I do however suggest that you read more about the housing market and rent levels to get a better understanding. The rental market is segmented and rent is sometimes regulated by law but not all landlords follow the regulations. This means that you sometimes can do something to counter high rents. Understanding the detail of danish law will allow you to know when

In Copenhagen and Århus you’ll find the highest rent prices. There is a shortage of smaller apartments and a lot of people competing for them which drives up the rent. Sometimes landlords are asking for more rent than the law allows which places people in an unfortunate situation. Accept the high rent or let the apartment go to someone else. There are options to handle these landlords and situations but there may be downsides to consider.

If you just want to get an idea of what you should expect to asked by a landlord then just look at the lists below. I’m not saying these prices are fair or appropriate, I’m just saying expect this to be the norm. You can use these prices to evaluate an offer, if someone is asking for more than these prices, then it is very expensive. If the rent asked is less then you could look into the offer in more detail.

Either way the devil is in the detail, sometimes a landlord can legally ask for 9.000 for a small studio and sometimes the law only allows the landlord to ask for 3.000-4.000 for a small studio. If you don’t know the law and your rights then you’ll risk getting ripped off.

Expect these rent levels to be the asking norm

Copenhagen

Shared room (10-20 m2) – 3.000-5.000 dkk

Single room (25-35 m2) – 5.000-7.000 dkk

Single room (35-55 m2) – 7.000-9.000 dkk

Two rooms (50-70 m2) – 8.000-11.000 dkk

Århus

Shared room (15-20 m2) – 3.000-4.000 dkk

Single room (25-35 m2) – 3.000-6.000 dkk

Single room (35-55 m2) – 4.000-7.000 dkk

Two rooms (50-70 m2) – 6.000-9.000 dkk